APOM Standard Online Training

Course Overview

10 CEUS

The APOM is an outcome measure specifically designed for Occupational Therapists in Mental Health settings and based on the Vona du Toit Model of Creative Ability (VdTMoCA).

For this reason only OTs with at least 6 months of clinical experience using the VdTMoCA are eligible to enroll for this course.

PLEASE CHECK YOUR ELIGIBILITY HERE. 

If you require further training in VdTMoCA please follow this link.

What is the APOM?

  • The Activity Participation Outcome Measure is presented as a software package and user manual and allows you to plot a client’s level of Activity Participation over 8 Domains on a spider chart.
  • An occupational therapist will assess or rate a mental health care user on these domains using an 18 point scale and record scores in the client spreadsheet.
  • The scale is based on the levels of Creative Ability as described by Vona du Toit.
  • Subsequent measures and outcomes can be plotted against the baseline to demonstrate change and improvement.
  • Graphs and Reports can also be automatically generated from the software.
  • These reports can be used in ward rounds, client or service feedback and as part of outcomes driven therapy.

Who can use the APOM?

  • OTs working in Mental Health in a variety of settings including: acute, medium-term, rehabilitation, substance abuse centres, community mental health projects or services, forensic settings and residential care facilities.
  • OTs working with the VdTMoCA in neuro or physical fields might also find the outcome measure helpful but it has not yet been validated for those groups.
  • OTs are welcome to attend training to venture research in this direction.

Format of the Training:

  • The training includes access to the APOM Manual and Software and licence to use this software in your individual practice.
  • The training consisted of 3 modules presenting a step-by-step guide on how the APOM was designed and its correct use in practice:
    • Introduction to the APOM
    • Overview of the VdTMOCA
    • Using the APOM (applying the APOM to a Case Study)
  • This online training allows you to work at your own pace, with support from a tutor, working through video presentations, quizzes and assignments to build competence.
  • This ensures the veracity of the tool and your clinical confidence on completion.
You have 6 months to complete this course.  **Please Contact Daleen Casteleijn should you wish to purchase a Group Licence for implementing the APOM in a service or facility and generating a service-specific database.

R2,200.00

Description

The OT Link is thrilled to partner with Daleen Casteleijn (PhD (OT)) to present the Activity Participation Outcome Measure (APOM) Official Training.

Daleen is a well known, experienced OT, researcher and lecturer in the field of occupational therapy in psychiatry. She started her career in the 1980s in public hospitals and worked at Kalafong Hospital, Weskoppies Hospital and Garankuwa Hospital. She began work in academics in the 1990’s and worked for 16 years in the Occupational Therapy Department of University of Pretoria. She moved to WITS Occupational Therapy Department in 2008. After the COVID-19 pandemic, she moved to the University of Pretoria, her alma mater where she is continuing her research on the APOM and supervising post-graduate students.

As part of her doctoral research, she developed the outcome measure: Activity Participation Outcome Measure (APOM). Therapists can use the APOM to track change in activity participation in patients with mental health conditions, stroke and traumatic brain injuries.  The APOM can also be used in functional capacity evaluations to establish baseline functioning and to track change in clients undergoing rehabilitation.  The APOM has international recognition and is used in countries such as the UK, Australia, Singapore and Japan.

 

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